Nevada considers laws for remote sports betting

17 October 2018

Nevada is to consider altering its regulations to allow players outside the state to place sports bets through licensed sportsbooks.

The Nevada Gaming Control Board met yesterday (Tuesday) to discuss proposals to expand the state’s sports betting market, whereby punters could place bets via mobile devices from outside Nevada’s boundaries.

MGM Resorts, Caesars Entertainment and Wynn have all backed the expansion that would also enable players to register remotely, as opposed to having to visit a casino.

However, not all Nevada casinos are behind the effort. Speaking on behalf of the Nevada Resort Association, Scott Nielson, who spent many years with Station Casinos, said the organisation has a preference to retain current regulations that require punters to register on-site.

“Generally, our members of our association are comfortable with the status quo in that, if you go through a marketing plan process, then you can sign people up for a wagering account on premises. So we are comfortable with that status quo,” Nielson said, according to Legal Sports Report.

The repeal of PASPA earlier this year granted other states the right to fully legalise sports betting, which in turn means Nevada now faces new challenges in terms of its market share. In September, research company Eilers & Krejcik Gaming tipped New Jersey to surpass the Nevada sports betting market by 2021.

Although the Control Board opted not to take any action at this week’s meeting, chairwoman Becky Harris told Legal Sports Report that she plans to speak with stakeholders to continue the discussion of remote registration.

Meanwhile, Santa Ana Star Casino Hotel in Bernalillo, New Mexico, has started accepting sports wagers. The launch follows an initial announcement last week from USBookmaking that it was to work with the casino on its sports betting offering.

Punters can wager on professional and collegiate sports at the casino. Players are limited to on-site wagering as the state is yet to allow sports betting anywhere else in New Mexico. The sportsbooks will be operated from Monday to Friday between noon and 8pm, and on weekends form 7am to 10pm, with two self-service kiosks during off-hours.

The Santa Ana Star Casino is operated by the Tamaya Nation at the Pueblo of Santa Ana, under the jurisdiction of tribal gaming laws. A tribal gaming compact between the state and tribes covers Class III gaming under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, which encompasses sports wagering.

Image: EconomicOldenburger