29 November 2019

End-of-year issues traditionally reflect the broader seasonal wind down, but iGB is rounding off 2019 with its strongest content line-up of the year. What started out as our people edition centred around the Salary Survey and Most Influential Women now also includes a series of articles driven by November’s Responsible Gambling Week.

The need for the sector to make gambling safer and being seen to do so by politicians and the public has become more urgent over the past year, as the industry battles rock-bottom perceptions and the imposition of ill-advised reforms that could have the opposite effect to that intended.

The headline of our annual benchmarking of sector pay in partnership with Pentasia is an 8.5% average rise, but this overlays a more complex regional and departmental picture which Pentasia’s experts unpack. We are also proud to present our second Most Influential Women rundown following a significant uplift in survey responses on last year.

  • magazine_issue
    1 July 2014

    Amaya and PokerStars, the biggest deal we have seen to date in the iGaming space. But this deal isn’t just interesting because of its scale, this is the most talked about and most speculated upon deal since the listing of PartyPoker.

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    28 May 2014

    Let's introduce this issue by offering a big welcome to iGaming Business’ new editor, Stephen Carter. Coming in for a World Cup issue is no easy task, but Stephen has managed it with aplomb.

  • magazine_issue
    1 March 2014

    Nevada, Delaware and New Jersey are pioneering the way forward with their individual intra-state programmes, and their conjoined multi-state liquidity compacts, and it would seem only a matter of time before America’s nationwide spectrum of iGaming regulation becomes more colourful.

     

  • magazine_issue
    1 January 2014

    Our main cover story this issue examines the biggest story coming out of New Jersey since the opening of the market. 

     

  • magazine_issue
    1 November 2013

    As 2014 comes to a close, the iGaming community looks back on a year of change. The EU, and especially the UK, has in many ways regressed, forming iGaming policy based on tax generation rather than on principles of a unified European market. 

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