21 March 2019

With our Nordic Affiliate Conference returning to Stockholm in late March, this issue we provide expert analysis and data on the region’s largest market following its recent regulated opening.

With Sweden’s raft of innovative operators and suppliers able to compete on home turf on a fully legal basis for the first time, regulation there is set to provide a tipping point for igaming in the region, growing the share of revenues from licensed offerings from 61.5% to 80.5% and the market by 28% to €4.5bn within five years, according to H2 Gambling Capital.

As well as the exclusive dashboard from our principal data provider, we get the lowdown on the turnaround of one of Sweden’s big two operators from Betsson’s Pontus Lindwall, an update from local analysts on how operators are adapting to the new market conditions and explore the potential of Trustly’s Pay N Play solution to revolutionise registration and KYC processes beyond the Nordics.

Enjoy the issue.

  • magazine_issue
    1 July 2014

    Amaya and PokerStars, the biggest deal we have seen to date in the iGaming space. But this deal isn’t just interesting because of its scale, this is the most talked about and most speculated upon deal since the listing of PartyPoker.

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    28 May 2014

    Let's introduce this issue by offering a big welcome to iGaming Business’ new editor, Stephen Carter. Coming in for a World Cup issue is no easy task, but Stephen has managed it with aplomb.

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    1 March 2014

    Nevada, Delaware and New Jersey are pioneering the way forward with their individual intra-state programmes, and their conjoined multi-state liquidity compacts, and it would seem only a matter of time before America’s nationwide spectrum of iGaming regulation becomes more colourful.

     

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    1 January 2014

    Our main cover story this issue examines the biggest story coming out of New Jersey since the opening of the market. 

     

  • magazine_issue
    1 November 2013

    As 2014 comes to a close, the iGaming community looks back on a year of change. The EU, and especially the UK, has in many ways regressed, forming iGaming policy based on tax generation rather than on principles of a unified European market. 

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